Posted by: keepthepeacevalley | July 4, 2012

Bring a lawnchair to the Paddle!

Although the forecast for Saturday does include some sun, be sure to bring a rain  jacket, chair and/or blanket to sit on at the Bear Flat takeout.  Treaty 8 will provide a Cultural Pavilion and Open Mic Session.

All are welcome (observers and paddlers) to take part in the festivities after the Paddle.   At approximately 2:00pm, after paddlers take out of the Peace River at Bear Flat (farmer’s field just downstream of Cache Creek before the Cache Creek Bridge on hwy. 29) Halfway River First Nation will be hosting a FREE BBQ. The Treaty 8 First Nations will be entertaining the crowd with   their stories and drumming songs. Cultural and informational displays will also be at the take out.

This will be a space for people to share what they value about the Peace River.  There will also be an open mic session so bring your guitar, poems, stories, and strong passionate voices.

 

 

Posted by: keepthepeacevalley | September 5, 2011

http://www.wildsight.ca/blogs/what-makes-me-tick

Posted by: peacevalley | March 27, 2010

2009 Paddle Pictures

See more pictures here….

Posted by: peacevalley | July 16, 2009

Over 400 people showing their passion for the Peace

Fort St. John, BC – Terrific winds and rain on Friday night that brought down power lines and stranded campers did not deter over 400 people, 146 boats and over 300 paddlers, from enjoying a sunny day in the fourth annual Paddle for the Peace Saturday, July 11th. Roland Willson, Chief of the West Moberly First Nations, said “With all the torrential downpours we had, it [the sun shining throughout the paddle] was like a miracle or something. It was as though we were blessed.” This joint project between the West Moberly First Nations and the Peace Valley Environment Association (PVEA), is a celebration of the Peace River. It allows people to express their love of the river and their concern over the proposed Site C dam.

Beginning in 2006, the 2009 event has grown into a festival. The day began with a pancake breakfast at Bear Flat hosted by the West Moberly First Nations. Onshore fun for the whole family included face painting, games for the kids and musical entertainment by folk band “Miss Quincy.” Another highlight was a raft constructed and paddled by the Bedaux Cowboys. Charles Bedaux’s “Champagne Safari” gave precious work to local cowboys during the Depression 75 years ago. These cowboys, related to the ones joining the 1934 expedition, highlighted the historical importance of the region. A paddler from the Yellowstone to Yukon (Y2Y) Conservation Initiative also came to support the shared goal of preserving the integrity of this important wildlife corridor.

The trip began with a prayer from West Moberly Elder Max Desjarlais at the Boon farm, and continued through the serene wilderness of the Peace River Valley to the community of Old Fort just below the proposed dam site. The 3-4 hour trip, through the proposed flood reserve, showcased the beauty of the Peace and some of what would be lost if Site C were to proceed. Planning is already underway for next year’s Paddle for the Peace.

For more information please contact:
Sandra Hoffmann at 250-787-1749 or savingthepeace(at)gmail.com

Posted by: peacevalley | May 25, 2009

Cowboys take to the River

A raft with cowboys will be floating down the river as part of the Paddle for the Peace Day on July 11th, to commemorate the cowboy explorers on the Bedaux Expedition and to celebrate the flowing waters of the Peace River.

The Hudson’s Hope Museum is currently exhibiting Charles Bedaux Expedition, Our Hudson’s Hope Cowboys: Packers on the Trail.

Bedaux’s initial press release claimed the purpose of the journey was “… to open a route between Fort St John, B.C and Telegraph Creek, BC, and to penetrate, explore and compile geographical, geological and meteorological data concerning certain unknown regions in the Canadian Rockies…”.

Click here to see pictures and learn about the historic expedition.

Posted by: peacevalley | July 14, 2008

Participants Paddled the Peace River In Record Numbers

Assembly of First Nations BC Regional Chief Shawn Atleo and his wife Nancy paddled the Peace River at the third annual Paddle for the Peace event.

A record number of people showed their support for protecting the Peace River Valley last Saturday. The third annual Paddle for the Peace event, hosted by West Moberly First Nations and the Peace Valley Environment Association, attracted 347 paddlers in 166 boats.

 

Paddlers came from as far as Austria and Germany.  There were several participants from Vancouver Island, the Sunshine Coast and the Okanagan Valley. The majority of the paddlers were local residents from Fort St. John, Dawson Creek, Chetwynd, Moberly Lake and Hudson Hope.

 

All attended to celebrate the Peace River Valley and show their opposition to the proposed Site C dam.

 

Assembly of First Nations BC Regional Chief Shawn Atleo from the Ahousaht First Nation on Vancouver Island paddled down the river with his wife Nancy.

 

Members from several Treaty 8 nations also canoed, volunteered, and cooked the feast for 227 people later in the afternoon, sponsored by the West Moberly First Nations.

 

Peace Valley Environment Association volunteers ran the logistics of the event and organized games and activities for the many children who participated.

Posted by: peacevalley | July 10, 2008

Paddle For The Peace

Local News
by CJDC

BC Hydro’s Site C pre consultation period is well under way throughout the peace region. However this weekend those who oppose the project will have a chance to voice their opinions as a part of the third annual Paddle for the Peace. Clarence Willson is an organizer for the event and says that anyone who’s interested in learning more about the Site C Dam project and the area it affects, is welcomed to join the paddle for the peace this weekend.

Anyone thats interested in attending the Paddle for the Peace can contact Danielle at 785-8510. Registration starts at 9am on Saturday, with the launch scheduled for 11am at the Halfway River Bridge.

Peter Jackson – Astral Radio News

Posted by: peacevalley | July 8, 2008

Peace Paddle Planned For Saturday

By 250 News

Tuesday, July 08, 2008 03:49 AM

 

For the third straight year, West Moberly First Nations Chief Roland Willson and Assembly of First Nations BC Regional Chief Shawn Atleo will be paddling a canoe down the Peace River to try and raise awareness about the Site “C” dam proposal.
 
The First Nations say the project would result in the flooding of 104km of homes, traditional territory, farms and wildlife habitat in the Peace River, Moberly River and Halfway River valleys.
 
 “We have more at stake than just our people’s deep history in this valley,” commented West Moberly First Nations Chief Roland Willson. “Today, we hunt and fish and live along the river. If they built the dam, the islands where most of the deer and elk have their calves would be under water. Their wintering grounds on the river slopes would be eroded by flood waters. The fish would be poisoned with mercury. New reservoir waters would be unusable for years. All these changes to the land will have a profound effect on the entire area, and threaten the way of life of our people and our neighbours.”
 
It isn’t all about first Nations says Chief Shawn Atleo. “We must ensure that all British Columbians are aware and educated about the potential impact of this development on First Nations lands and people in the Peace River valley.”
 
The West Moberly First Nations and the Peace Valley Environment Association organized the original Paddle for the Peace in 2006 to raise awareness about the proposed Site C hydro-electric dam. In 2007, more than 300 people canoed and rowed down the Peace River to show their support for the valley.
 
“I paddle each year because I don’t want to see this amazing, important valley destroyed for power-greed,” said event organizer Danielle Yeoman. “Instead of a large-scale dam, BC Hydro should be looking at truly green energy options, such as wind and tidal power. The province can’t afford to lose the Peace River’s intact ecosystem, the prime agricultural land or the wildlife habitat. They are too valuable.”
 
The three hour paddle starts from the Halfway River launch and ends downstream at Bear Flats.  All canoes and boats will launch at 11 am on July 12th.

West Moberly First Nations Chief Roland Willson and Assembly of First Nations BC Regional Chief Shawn Atleo will be paddling a canoe down the Peace River July 12, 2008, to raise awareness and learn more about Northern First Nations’ concerns regarding the Site C hydroelectric dam proposal.  The proposed dam would flood 104km of homes, traditional territory, farms and wildlife habitat in the Peace River, Moberly River and Halfway River valleys in Northeastern BC.

 

Many of the Treaty 8 First Nations and non-indigenous communities up and down the inter-provincial river system would be affected by the creation of the Site C dam and reservoir.

 

“We have more at stake than just our people’s deep history in this valley,” commented West Moberly First Nations Chief Roland Willson. “Today, we hunt and fish and live along the river.  If they built the dam, the islands where most of the deer and elk have their calves would be under water.  Their wintering grounds on the river slopes would be eroded by flood waters. The fish would be poisoned with mercury.  New reservoir waters would be unusable for years. All these changes to the land will have a profound effect on the entire area, and threaten the way of life of our people and our neighbors.”

 

“Flooding of the valley will create an imbalance to an already extremely stressed ecosystem. People need to understand that the connectivity of the land is extremely important to maintain the biodiversity of this area, especially for animals such as the Grizzly Bear.”

 

“It is important that First Nations’ voices are heard and their jurisdictions are respected when provincial energy and land-use decisions are made,” says Chief Atleo. “We must ensure that all British Columbians are aware and educated about the potential impact of this development on First Nations lands and people in the Peace River valley.”

 

The West Moberly First Nations and the Peace Valley Environment Association organized the original Paddle for the Peace in 2006 to raise awareness about the proposed Site C hydro-electric dam. In 2007, more than 300 people canoed and rowed down the Peace River to show their support for the valley. Participants came from as far as Germany, although most were local First Nations, farmers, rural and urban residents.  All were concerned about the loss of the valley’s ecological, First Nation, traditional and agricultural values.

 

“I paddle each year because I don’t want to see this amazing, important valley destroyed for power-greed,” said event organizer Danielle Yeoman. “Instead of a large-scale dam, BC Hydro should be looking at truly green energy options, such as wind and tidal power.  The province can’t afford to lose the Peace River’s intact ecosystem, the prime agricultural land or the wildlife habitat. They are too valuable.”

 

The three hour paddle starts from the Halfway River launch and ends downstream at Bear Flats. The family-friendly event concludes with a community feast and celebration, hosted by the West Moberly First Nations. To register for the 3rd annual Paddle for the Peace, visit www.paddleforthepeace.ca.

 

The West Moberly First Nation and the Peace Valley Environment Association are working on several research, public education and stewardship projects together, to foster broad community engagement with respect to the preservation and conservation of the Peace River valley.

Posted by: peacevalley | July 4, 2007

Paddle for the Peace Ready for its Second Outing

Northeast News

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